Hairmatters

Hairdressing|Trichology|Wig Consultancy.

MY LITTLE SECRET
part 2 - my first experience with wigs

Its December and I’ve gone to see Richard and Georgina for my pre Christmas cut and colour. I arrive at the salon feeling pretty rubbish about my hair but 90 minutes later I feel transformed. As always, for now I feel like a million dollars. I know it’s an unrealistic expectation but sometimes I just wish I could feel like this more of the time. A little voice in my head is saying ‘well maybe with a wig you could’. Richard and I have our usual chat about tai chi, yoga, holidays and…as usual..wigs….He KNOWS I am keen, I’ve dropped enough hints, but I’m nervous about taking the plunge. As we settle up, 'how about about it?’ he asks - I know exactly what he means and that’s all the encouragement I need.
So fast forward to the first week of January, and I arrive at the salon for my initial wig appointment. I feel a little nervous and slightly embarrassed but the session is held in the salon’s private consultation room which helps . I’m having a reasonably good hair day so why would I even be thinking about a wig? But I know Richard understands so I quickly relax. He measures my head and we look at wig catalogues. I’m thinking something exactly like my own hair, very short and dark brown. Richard is suggesting something a touch longer and a slightly lighter shade but he can order in a small selection to try on. I trust his judgment - he always gets it right with my real hair.
The wigs arrive within a couple of days so my next appointment (trying on, no obligation to buy) is in the salon itself but I’m booked in when there’s no other clients there (I’m not quite ready to come out yet.) We try on three. The first feels like a bush on my head - there’s almost a bit too much hair but I agree it’s quite nice to look at. The third is my own colour, but the style is a bit too flat on top and I don’t want to be messing around with products, I’m trying to leave all that behind. The middle one I know instinctively is THE ONE. Yes it does feel a bit odd but I’m pleasantly surprised at how natural looking it is even though its synthetic. OK so it’s a bit longer and lighter in shade but its not unlike a style I used to have and looking in the mirror I look…well… just like me. (Richard’s verdict is 'amazing’ - I’m not quite ready to go that far yet). If anyone hadn’t seen me for a while they would simply think I’d just had my hair 'done’. We discuss how to put it on, how to look after it, the pro’s and con’s of wig caps and Richard gives it a little trim to personalise it.

Posted 63 weeks ago

One of our clients wrote this Blog!

MY LITTLE SECRET

part 1 - some initial thoughts on wigs

I’m fast approaching my mid 50’s (a little too fast for comfort) and I have a lot to feel thankful for - I have a good set of (my own) teeth, I don’t need reading glasses and I can squeeze into a size 8 - just. I am blessed to have good physical health and as for my mind, well that got stuck somewhere in its 30’s but that’s no bad thing. But something isn’t quite right or at least not as it was, and many women of my age would agree - it’s the hair. It changes, it dries out, it DROPS out, it gets finer and here’s the sting, it doesn’t show any signs of staging a comeback. Lucky I had more than enough to start with then.

I also feel extremely lucky that during a ‘hiatus’ with hairdressers and desperate to find one I could bond with I found Richard Hall at Hair Matters. Not only is he the best hairdresser I have ever had (and I’ve been through a few) he is also a trichologist (offering consultations for hair growth problems, many of which can be solved) and a wig fitter as well. He was exactly the kind of hair dresser I was looking for, so for the moment although it feels as though my hair is getting thinner, with a great short haircut, a colour from Georgina and advice on the right products (as well as how to use them - essential) my hair looks pretty ok. But sometimes….well I just miss my old mop, the one I never cared about and took for granted, the one I could easily wash and leave to its own devices - goodness how times have changed.

Anyway before I start reminiscing too much, onto the wig thing. During my regular hair appointments Richard and I often chat about wigs as it’s part of his line of work and I started to develop a real interest. (Just to note, readers, that he has never once even hinted that I actually need one because the truth is I don’t - yet). Could a wig be the perfect solution to a bad hair day? Short of time or want an instant new look? Pop on a wig. Going on holiday? Why take all that hair paraphernalia with you when you could just 'wig and go’. Our Afro-Caribbean sisters embrace wig wearing as we do putting on make up so why is there still a stigma attached to wigs? Richard assures me that this is changing and more women are turning to wig wearing for all the aforementioned reasons so could wearing one occasionally be the confidence booster I was looking for? I am so keen I have wig 'fantasies’ and yet ….I just don’t feel quite ready to take the plunge.

Posted 92 weeks ago
<p>What is the secret to getting the best from your hairdresser ?<br/></p><p>“I realise I am just a slave to thee arteest! but……”</p><p>(Quote Liz Reid.)</p><p>Once you have found a hairdresser skilled in the arts of consultation and hairdressing, It may be surprising to learn that the client still has a roll to play, in order to leave the salon with the best hairdo in town!</p><p>Make an appointment, arrive on time, if you are a new client, visit the salon for a consultation in advance, you may need a skin sensitivity test 48 hours before a colour and if you have agreed upon a result with the hairdresser they can schedule the right amount of time and resources needed for your visit.</p><p>Have realistic expectations, bringing pictures with you is a good idea, its gives the hairdresser a lot of information, remember we are working with your hair and it does have limitations.</p><p>If you already have an idea for a hairstyle, be prepared to listen to the hairdressers input, if you don’t and are looking for advice, listen to the hairdressers input, then make a decision on a look and see it through, don’t change your mind half way through, asking for your hair to be a little shorter can mean the whole cut to be done again.</p><p>Don’t suffer in silence, If you don’t want to talk, the back wash is uncomfortable, the hairdryer too hot! let us know, we want to do something about it.</p><p>Do check out a few salons, go on recommendation of a friend, go for a consultation with the hairdresser, see if your personalities, their ideas about fashion and skills are compatible.  </p><p>If you come to the salon on a regular basis, you can give us feedback, which allows us to develop and personalise a style for you. Any issues  you are having are more easily resolved when we have a clearer frame of reference. Hair grows about half an inch per month, 6 to 8 weeks between hair cuts is a good averaged, most colours will need some maintenance at this time.</p><p>Don’t wash your hair on the day of a colour, wear a polo neck, put your head down when under the heat lamps or distract the hairdresser whilst they are concentrating on being creative.</p><p>Listen to the stylists recommendations about home hair care, correct shampoo, conditioner, treatments and styling products. Ask questions if you are not sure about styling your hair, the hairdresser will probably have some tips because they know, the better your hair looks the more likely people will compliment your hair and enquire as to where you had it done.</p><p>Not listening to the above advice could result in you feeling like the Lego lady!</p>

What is the secret to getting the best from your hairdresser ?

“I realise I am just a slave to thee arteest! but……”

(Quote Liz Reid.)

Once you have found a hairdresser skilled in the arts of consultation and hairdressing, It may be surprising to learn that the client still has a roll to play, in order to leave the salon with the best hairdo in town!

Make an appointment, arrive on time, if you are a new client, visit the salon for a consultation in advance, you may need a skin sensitivity test 48 hours before a colour and if you have agreed upon a result with the hairdresser they can schedule the right amount of time and resources needed for your visit.

Have realistic expectations, bringing pictures with you is a good idea, its gives the hairdresser a lot of information, remember we are working with your hair and it does have limitations.

If you already have an idea for a hairstyle, be prepared to listen to the hairdressers input, if you don’t and are looking for advice, listen to the hairdressers input, then make a decision on a look and see it through, don’t change your mind half way through, asking for your hair to be a little shorter can mean the whole cut to be done again.

Don’t suffer in silence, If you don’t want to talk, the back wash is uncomfortable, the hairdryer too hot! let us know, we want to do something about it.

Do check out a few salons, go on recommendation of a friend, go for a consultation with the hairdresser, see if your personalities, their ideas about fashion and skills are compatible.  

If you come to the salon on a regular basis, you can give us feedback, which allows us to develop and personalise a style for you. Any issues  you are having are more easily resolved when we have a clearer frame of reference. Hair grows about half an inch per month, 6 to 8 weeks between hair cuts is a good averaged, most colours will need some maintenance at this time.

Don’t wash your hair on the day of a colour, wear a polo neck, put your head down when under the heat lamps or distract the hairdresser whilst they are concentrating on being creative.

Listen to the stylists recommendations about home hair care, correct shampoo, conditioner, treatments and styling products. Ask questions if you are not sure about styling your hair, the hairdresser will probably have some tips because they know, the better your hair looks the more likely people will compliment your hair and enquire as to where you had it done.

Not listening to the above advice could result in you feeling like the Lego lady!

Posted 116 weeks ago

What sort of wigs are most suitable for Chemotherapy patients?

“There are studies that show that for many women, losing their hair is worse than losing a breast. That’s because you can conceal the loss of a breast, but hair loss is so obvious and apparent.”

– Marisa Weiss, M.D., president and founder, breastcancer.org


Not all types of Chemotherapy, lead to complete hair loss, the consultant involved will usually inform the patient of what to expect before the treatment starts. If hair loss is likely, it is a good idea to visit a wig consultant to see what options are available and possibly obtain a wig so the patient can feel more prepared. Hair loss from Chemotherapy is termed Anagen Effluvium and generally once the treatment has stopped the hair starts to return back to health. Sometimes the hair grows back curly or white, after a few months   the hair usually returns back to normal and its just a matter of time for the hair to grow back to the length to the original style.

During the chemotherapy treatment the scalp can sometimes become sensitive to various products. A fragrance/colour free shampoo and conditioner is advisable there is a product available through the clinic.
As the hair comes back to health, it is good practice not to colour too soon and to look after the hair and scalp with conditioning treatments.

Broadly speaking there are two types of wigs to look at. Human hair and High quality man made fibre wigs, generally the latter is most appropriate here although there are exceptions .

The high quality man made fibre wigs are a lot easier to look after, there are great ranges of modern styles and fashionable colours to choose from, this would be my first choice.

Human hair wigs take a lot more looking after, are more expensive and the process of obtaining the right wig requires more time and visits to the salon, which when a person may feel unwell isn’t always the best option.

However some clients take a great deal of pleasure in looking after their own hair and are prepared to spend  the time and patience on the wig. Clients that have very blonde hair, a completely natural colour or long hair may also consider this option. These are areas where the synthetic wigs are not quite as good and it could be worth the extra investment to get the right result depending on the individual client.

Posted 118 weeks ago

What is Trichology?


“A hair in the head is worth two in the brush”

I am often asked what Trichology is? My reply is usually the study ,diagnosis and treatment of hair and scalp disorders, although it also covers hair in health and how we can maintain our hair in good condition.

At Chester Hair Clinic, I often see patients with hair loss conditions, there are three main categories, temporary, permanent and treatable.

Temporary, usually means the condition will improve by itself, given time.

Permanent, there is no treatment option. Cosmetic solutions ( wigs, hairpieces etc) or hair transplantation are the solution.

Treatable, there are treatment options, hair loss drugs are available, sometimes improved nutrition is the answer, other aspects of life style can also be significant.

The scalp conditions that I encounter range from eczema and psoriasis, to scaring scalp disorders, some treatments can be offered through the clinic, others need referral to a dermatologist.  

Hair in health refers to our hair care regime, how we treat the hair and the products we use to look after it with.    

After consultation, I aim to make a diagnosis and then present the patient with the various treatment options. Sometimes just understanding the condition helps to make the patient feel more in control of the situation, which can be a benefit in bringing the hair or scalp back to health.

Posted 120 weeks ago

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3 Castle Street, Chester, CH1 2DS, Cheshire | 01244 346798 | info@hairmatters.co.uk